Book Review: The Iron Jackal–a Tale of the Ketty Jay by Chris Wooding

Review by: Prof. Jenn

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The Iron Jackal is a steampunky, Firefly-esque romp though the fantasy lands of Vardia and Samarla, lands full of warring factions, slavery and rebellion, corrupt officials and those that fly outside the law. Our protagonist, Captain Frey, is one of the latter. Actually, I’m not really sure he is our protagonist exactly but I’ll get to that later. When Captain Frey carelessly handles a rare relic he and his crew, er, acquired for a client of his ex, things go pretty gosh darned amuck and the whole crew of the Ketty Jay plus one have to scramble to make things right.

There is action aplenty in this book–in fact, the opening scene is a barroom shootout and subsequent chase–and our lead is just as wry a leader and barely better than the bad guys as a Captain Mal or an Indiana Jones. The action is similar to these favorites too: heart-pounding chases, tense scenes of theft and skullduggery, and a colorful band of miscreant minor characters. This is where I ran into this book’s only real flaw that I can find: there are many characters with already-established back stories and relationships, and this book being a sequel, sometimes I got my characters confused or didn’t quite get what was going on in the detail I needed.

 

Also, the POV shifts often, which added to my confused spots–I often got confused who I was supposed to “be” in some situations. But what is well done about the characters is a sense of genuine emotion. Frey’s feelings for his ex, Crake’s complex emotional world surrounding his golem, and the many examples of true loyalty make all the characters round and complex, a good thing since this steampunk world tilted on the edge of Lieber-esque urban fantasy needs that human quality to ground it.

Bottom Line: I recommend The Iron Jackal, especially for those already familiar with the other Tales of the Ketty Jay.

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