Posts tagged Robert Kirkman

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Robert Kirkman’s Thief of Thieves Review

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Review by Ermelinda

The Walking Dead creator, Robert Kirkman has caught the television writing bug and his series Thief of Thieves proves it. Enjoying the efforts and fruits of collaboration with fellow writers, Kirkman decided to apply this method in creating his series Thief of Thieves, for Skybound an imprint of Image Comics. Kirkman assembled the writing talents of Nick Spencer (DC‘s T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents), and James Asmus (Marvel’s X-Men). These two talents are great on their own, but with Kirkman leading the story, arcs and dialogue are gritty, realistic, and at times very funny.

The cohesive fluid that keeps this plethora of talent flowing is the art of Shawn Martinbrough. Full disclosure, as a Native New Yorker, I always have a soft cheering spot for a fellow native. Yet, even if Martinbrough hadn’t been born in the Bronx, I would still go crazy praising this man’s artwork. Shawn Martinbrough has illustrated books for DC, Marvel, Vertigo, and now Image. He works a noir comic with his unique style, using the process of working with light and shadow, to visually enhance and evolve the story as it unfolds.

Without giving too much away, Thief of Thieves is the coarse, rough and tumble, unapologetic story of Conrad Paulson, also known as the master thief, Redmond. As Redmond, he is at the top of his game, executing well planned heists while attempting to stay retired. He dives with wisdom through the web of his past, where the an unfinished heist, the greatest of his career, haunts him. Redmond invites temptation by keeping close company with his sleek and sassy apprentice, Celia, who assists and entices him with every job. They feed off each other and the dialogue is electric.

As Conrad Paulson, Redmond is man whose world has gravitated away from his estranged wife and son that he still loves. Conrad’s son Augustus is a young man attempting quite unsuccessfully, to follow in the footsteps of a father he simultaneously admires and resents.

This is where Robert Kirkman’s voice shines. His ability to release a story with engaging, emotionally pivoting relationships shines through. You feel for Conrad and Augustus, rooting that they find common ground and reach some state of equilibrium.
The tension and strain of the drug cartel Augustus has involved himself in, pulls the suspense and gears their relationship to drop like an elevator descending into hell. A father and son journey, unleashing unyielding tough love, anger, caring, and distrust. Thief of thieves achieves the goal of humanizing Redmond, all while creating curiosity for the mental ability and physical agility it takes to achieve a grand heist while fighting off the law and the drug cartel.

It is an excellent addition to any Noir comic collector’s shelf, and a must read for Kirkman fans. As a side note, AMC and Robert Kirkman have been working on scripts to develop Thief of Thieves into a new series for the network. We shall see what Kirkmania at AMC brings forth.

 

 

 

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The Walking Dead: Comic Book vs TV Series [Episode Two: “Guts”]

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Transitioning a story from one medium to another is a tricky business. It never fails, when a book, video game, television show or movie is adapted into another format someone will always tell you, the original was better. Why is that? Is there some unwritten rule that once a story’s been told you’ll never see, read, or play a better version?

Over the next few months I’m going to explore that notion with one of my favorite stories, The Walking Dead. Before it became AMC’s highest rated program of all time it was already an award winning comic book series. Both mediums tell the story of a group of survivors in a zombie apocalypse, but how they’re presenting their story is completely different. Not only are there the inherent differences between a comic book and television series, but the TV series has taken certain liberties when it comes to adapting its source material. Not surprisingly, some fans have taken issue with this.

Each article in this ongoing series will focus on an episode of the TV series, discuss what was comic book inspired, what’s a deviation, and whether it’s good or bad. Plus, which version had the most gruesome zombie kill! Y’know, for the kids. It should be noted these posts will contain SPOILERS for the TV series as well as all corresponding comics.

(more…)

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The Walking Dead: Comic Book vs TV Series

0

Transitioning a story from one medium to another is a tricky business. It never fails, when a book, video game, television show or movie is adapted into another format someone will always tell you, the original was better. Why is that? Is there some unwritten rule that once a story’s been told you’ll never see, read, or play a better version?

Over the next few months I’m going to explore that notion with one of my favorite stories, The Walking Dead. Before it became AMC’s highest rated program of all time it was already an award winning comic book series. Both mediums tell the story of a group of survivors in a zombie apocalypse, but how they’re presenting their story is completely different. Not only are there the inherent differences between a comic book and television series, but the TV series has taken certain liberties when it comes to adapting its source material. Not surprisingly, some fans have taken issue with this.

Each article in this ongoing series will focus on an episode of the TV series, discuss what was comic book inspired, what’s a deviation, and whether it’s good or bad. Plus, which version had the most gruesome zombie kill! Y’know, for the kids. It should be noted these posts will contain SPOILERS for the TV series as well as all corresponding comics.

(more…)

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