Posts tagged Saga

Saga #13 Cover.  Image Courtesy of imagecomics.com

Review: Saga #13

0
Saga #13 Cover.  Image Courtesy of imagecomics.com

Saga #13 Cover. Image Courtesy of imagecomics.com

Writing: Brian K. Vaughan

Art: Fiona Staples

Review by Dorina Arellano

When last we saw our heroes, we were left with a pretty big “oh, snap!” moment, so I’m sure I wasn’t the only one who was desperately hoping to learn of Alana and Marko’s immediate fate in this chapter. Unfortunately, we go back in time for a bit, as Brian K. Vaughan likes to do, because he’s a mean, genius tease. Fortunately, however, every single page of Saga is exciting, thanks to Mr. Vaughan’s fantastic storytelling, his very relatable heroes and villains, and Fiona Staple’s exquisite and provocative art.

As we’re already aware, Hazel and her parents set off to find their favorite author, D. Oswald Heist, on his remote home planet Quietus. Their first exchange with him is highly amusing, like the rest of the witty dialogue we’re already used to from Vaughan. Gwendolyn and friends are trying to get back on their tail, as per usual, and The Will gets a visit from an old friend. We also encounter a wounded soldier and this universe’s version of TMZ, which should continue to make things interesting on a bigger scale for our protagonists. Therefore, we don’t really get a whole lot of new story in this issue, but the setup continues to be quite entertaining and fulfilling for such a short read.

In just thirteen issues, this pair of storytellers has already managed to make me laugh out loud several times, be completely shocked and grossed out, and tear up at least once. It’s rare when comic books make you care about so many characters this deeply, even the minor ones. If you’re familiar with Vaughan’s past work (Y: The Last Man, Ex Machina) you’re well aware that the worlds he creates touch upon the same, relevant, hardcore social and political issues we live through on a daily basis. It only makes our heroes’ journey that much more tense and meaningful. I can’t wait to see what happens to Hazel’s parents and what that hilarious narrating baby’s fate will be. I’ll be sad when it’s over, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it ends up being one of my favorite comic book series.

saga12review-1

Saga #12 review

0

saga12review-1

Writing: Brian K. Vaughan

Art: Fiona Staples

Review by Melissa Megan

Oh, Saga, how you play with my emotions. The games this series plays are heartbreaking, thrilling, disturbing. The opening scene of issue #12 is a prime example. Prince Robot IV has been wounded in war and calls upon the aid of the medic, a mouse-like creature with healing skills. As the medic administers medicine, he explains that he’s not a native to the planet but is supporting Prince Robot’s forces in hopes of earning his degree and as thanks for their help on his home planet. It’s almost warm and fuzzy until a poisonous gas is released upon the unit and the medic reveals that he wasn’t given a mask to protect himself. It gets messy from there.

In the present day, Prince Robot is on a mission to track down Alana and Marko, like so many others. His government has their own reasons for wanting to dispose of the forbidden family. He’s landed on a solitary , foggy planet where he believes a reclusive author can lead him to the fugitives. Mister Heist wrote a romance novel that Alana and Marko are fans of; the book is believed to be a revolutionary text in disguise and Prince Robot thinks the novel was the inspiration behind the couple’s idea to run from their homes and duties.

The majority of issue #12 is focused on Prince Robot’s verbal chess game with the intelligent author, trying to surmise if he has knowledge of the whereabouts of Alana, Marko and Hazel. It’s not quite as much fun as the usual plethora of alien creatures and formidable planets, but it’s engaging and imperative to the story line. And as usual, the issue sets up an exciting and tense possibility for the next one to come. Holy shit, does this book perfect story telling. Magnificent artwork accompanying genius writing makes Saga an absolute masterpiece of a comic book. I’m not sure how many ways I can say that I love this series, but I’ll keep trying.

Saga_11_Full

Review: Saga #11

0

Saga_11_Full

Writing: Brian K. Vaughan

Art: Fiona Staples

Review by Melissa Megan

Boy does Brian K. Vaughan know how to open an issue and get your attention. In another of Hazel’s flashbacks to her parents’ beginnings, we get to be a fly on the wall to what I assume is her moment of being conceived. Every naughty detail revealed and oh boy, is Alana naughty! Of course it’s also a difficult realization of the kind of situation Hazel was brought in to: her parents fugitives, each of their respect homelands hunting them down. Alana and Marko aren’t even sure they can breed, being of two different species from different planets, but the method of baby making seems to work just fine.

Another great skill of Brian K. Vaughan is transitioning from one place in a story to another, seamlessly, without depleting the jarring effect of that jump. The ship containing Alana, Marko, Hazel, Marko’s parents and Hazel’s ghostly babysitter is spiraling towards a freshly born fetus planet that appears hungry. In another ship which has already been damaged and exposed to open space, The Will tries to save Lying Cat while Gwendolyn holds tight to the slave child they rescued from Sextillion. If you aren’t reading Saga already, you should be appropriately confused by now.

Every single issue of Saga contains so much. So very much that I often find myself re-reading an issue to make sure I didn’t miss something really important. Issue #11 is powerful and emotional. I’m not going to spoil this for anyone, but I will say that by the end of this issue you’ll feel some feelings that might not be happy. This issue also has many opportunities for Fiona Staples to show off her art skills with sweeping space landscapes and beautiful scenes of magic making. The creators of Saga are the power couple of 2013 and Saga is their glowing love child.

Read Saga and don’t stop. Well, if you read one issue you won’t want to stop.

saga-10

Review: Saga #10

0

saga-10

Writing: Brian K. Vaughan

Art: Fiona Staples

Review by Melissa Megan

 

Marko and Alana are the hottest couple in comic books. Does anyone not know that by now? The opening of this issue is yet another fantastic example of Brian Vaughan’s perfect writing in this series. The first panel, Marko standing shirtless, gently asking “Please. Keep reading.”, is not only sexy but gives the exhilarating feeling of being spoken to by this 2 dimensional book character. This leads to a touching peek at where the intense love between Marko and Alana began. I can’t recall ever reading about two characters in a comic book before that I felt so intimately connected with, as if Saga is really just the biography of a couple of very close friends of mine.

Then, there’s the hunt for the missing ghostly babysitter. Marko and his hard edged mother find themselves searching a strange planet that they’ve been told will soon be ‘hatching’. And yet another shining exhibit of why Saga has quickly gained huge praise and is selling out copies everywhere: incredibly fresh, creepy, awesome alien life forms and settings. It just never stops with this series, each issue throwing new and fascinating characters at you, opening up new worlds filled with completely unique adventures. No matter what comparisons you can make between Saga and other books or films that it shares style with, I honestly don’t think anything like this has been accomplished before.

To sum up this issue, Marko and Alana reunite with their missing babysitter, family ties are strengthened and a planet gives forth new, dangerous life. Gwendolyn, Marko’s bitter ex, is hot on their tail and employing the help of an infamous assassin and a child with special powers of sight. An unfortunate loss leaves us wondering how many more there will be before Marko & Alana are either captured or somehow escape for good.

Saga rocks my socks off, every freakin’ month. I dread the day that this series comes to an end, because it’s one of the most exciting, creative things I’ve had the honor of reading in years. The writing of Brian K. Vaughan and the art of Fiona Staples are a magical marriage that many, many comic book readers are thankful for.

saga9-666x1024

Review: Saga #9

0

Writing: Brian K. Vaughan

Art: Fiona Staples

Review by Melissa Megan

 

Recently, a friend of mine said something like ‘Saga fans are the Breaking Bad fans of comic books’. (Elliot Serrano) So true. If you haven’t been reading Saga this past year, you’re missing out on one of the greatest things to happen in comic books since Y: The Last Man. Saga is one of my top 5 favorites of 2012, and so far this year hasn’t let up in quality or pure awesomeness.

Issue #9 brings us back to The Will, who has been distracted from his job of hunting down a forbidden family, by his discovery and aching desire to rescue a child sold in to slavery. He dreams of the return of his murdered love, The Stalk. In marches Gwendolyn, a political princess with a personal agenda to get The Will back on his target, and she offers to do what she can to help him get what he wants.

From Issue #1 of this series, you can’t help but hope for the successful escape of Marko and Alana, new parents to what most consider an ‘abomination’. They’re hunted by their respective governments, hired assassins and now a bitter ex, Gwendolyn. This issue is a prime example of why Saga has won so many hearts. It’s not so much the fantastic, magical creatures or the sci-fi backdrop of interplanetary war, or even the absurdly clean but equally pretty art work of Fiona Staples. Saga’s real allure lies in the depth and complexity of it’s characters. The Will is a deadly assassin hunting down a family who want nothing more than to be left alone to love each other. By all accounts, we should hate this guy. Now that The Will has made it his objective to save a slave child whom he just met, we suddenly have empathy for him and think ‘maybe he’s not so bad’. 

Even Gwen, Marko’s embittered ex fiancee who was first introduced with a pissy attitude and a chip on her shoulder, exposes some heart and tenderness in the rescue of the child. Saga keeps you guessing at every turn, never completely sure who is an enemy and who might be an ally in disguise.

Saga is one of the best comics in the shelf right now, no question. The story is enchanting, the art a perfect match and the characters genuine. Start reading it now and don’t miss out on this treat.

 

p5rn7vb
SagaTC800W

Review: Saga, Vol. 1

1

Writing by: Brian K. Vaughan

Art by: Fiona Staples

Saga Vol. 1 collects #1-6 of the ongoing series. I am genuinely baffled as to how this series went unnoticed by me until now. I decided to review the TP, as I prefer to read new stories in big chunks rather than small issues at a time, and was immediately enraptured with it. I mean I LOVED it. I’ve since been given the ‘oh, yeah, you haven’t read that??’ several times from comic reading friends, so I feel like a bad collector now for missing this one. I shall amend that mistake here and now. I plan to pick this up in my local shop today and read the next two issues that are available digitally, while I wait impatiently for another TP to be published.

For those who are new to Saga, I’ll give you the gist. Alana and Marko are very different creatures from different planets whose respective species are at war with each other. In fact, it’s seen as a traitorous crime against both sides that they have fallen in love and begun a new family together. Saga opens with an intense child birth scene in which it’s very apparent that these two prior soldiers care for each deeply and despise the spreading war between their homelands; it’s also very apparent that their new family will not be accepted by authorities and that they must, literally, run for their lives. Their relationship is tumultuous but incredibly supportive, the new parents are terrified and powerful all at once. They are prepared to do anything necessary to protect their new family from the many forces who challenge it’s existence, including their own stubborn dispositions.

First off, the story. Amazing. Brilliant. Exciting and so different. The addition of narration from the child’s point of view is incredibly creative and gives the story an extra layer of intrigue. Is she grown as she narrates? Who is she? Where is she now? This story never stops for air, it just rolls along at a perfect speed, constantly introducing new, awesome creatures and worlds. Alana and Marko can never get too comfortable, their quest for survival and freedom will not be won without plenty of pain and hardship along the way.

Next, the artwork of Fiona Staples. If you consider yourself a semi-knowledgeable comics reader, you have seen and heard her name before. her style is so pretty, so easy to fall in to. It’s instantly recognizable as she works wonders with lines and shadows, somehow managing to create great depth in the panels without ever making any stroke too heavy or hard. She excels at facial expressions; it’s always very clear what the character is feeling, regardless of what is being said. This art style is absolutely perfect for this story, opening up beautiful fantasy worlds in equal clarity and detail as the words of Brian K. Vaughan do.

Saga is one of the most innovative, quality pieces of comic book work I’ve read in years and if you are not reading this, you are missing out on a real diamond of a creation. This book has adventure, romance, fantasy, sci-fi and violence and it’s all brought together in a polished, wonderfully illustrated gift box of a publication. Buy it and read it, right now.

 

Go to Top