Posts tagged SDCC

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The Her Universe Fashion Show at Comic-Con 2014

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Her Universe, Hot Topic and Nerdist Industries put on their very first “Geek Couture” fashion show last night at SDCC and it was fantastic. The Hyatt Ballroom was packed, the designers came up with some beautiful and unique nerdy outfits, and Her Universe’s very own Ashley Eckstein looked beautiful in a Totoro inspired couture dress, mainly because she was excited to announce that Her Universe has acquired licensing rights for Studio Ghibli merch to be sold at Hot Topic this fall! Yes, I’m just as excited as you!

My personal favorite designs of the night were Lauren Bregman’s “Effie’s Trinkets” worn by stunning model Adrianne Curry, and Andrew MacLaine’s “Regina’s Curse” which literally wowed the crowd. Regina herself, Lana Parrilla, even tweeted about it.

20140724_193254 Screen shot 2014-07-24 at 8.12.25 PM

Hopefully this will become an annual event, so you nerds can attend next time. And props to DJ Amanda for playing some sweet 80s jams during the Back to the Future and Metroid inspired portion of the night.

For more information on the event and where to buy cool geek fashion visit http://www.heruniverse.com/

 

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Interview: Nathan Hamill (Toy Designer, Artist, Nerd)

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It’s almost time for San Diego Comic-Con 2014 and, like all of you nerds, I’m trying to figure out what I really want to spend my money on because, holy crap, there are always so many cool toys there! So, in my quest to find all the must-have releases this year, I decided to interview one of my friends and favorite toy designers, Nathan Hamill. I already own most of his figures, and since he keeps coming up with even cooler ones every year, I’m very much looking forward to seeing what he comes up with next. So, if you’re one of the many lucky nerds attending the convention this year, make sure you don’t miss out on his awesome SDCC releases. Photos and info on where to buy below!

1) Most of us know you’re a ginormous nerd with a pretty solid toy collection that I often want to steal from, but how did you end up becoming a toy designer? What was your motivation to release Boris, your first vinyl figure?

I started with Boris when Patrick Geologo, who I once worked with at Toy Planet when I was in high school, was looking for artists to work with as U1Toy Arts was just starting out. Boris was originally a design for a cartoon called Animal Bandits. He’s a surly, suspicious little guy with a Napoleon complex. Like a Joe Pesci of the forest. And thanks for not stealing my toys. I know it can be hard not to.

2) What toys did you cherish most as a child? What are some of your favorite figures that you own now?

I carried a Darth Vader 3 3/4″ Kenner figure with me wherever I went. I had a vice like grip on that one. And currently it is Lavabear: Classic Ed., which I took all around Disney World on a recent trip. Some things never change.

hamillcluttersdcc

3) You have some really cool releases coming up for SDCC. In particular, I’m excited about Lavabear and can’t wait to get one. What’s his story? Where did you get the inspiration to create him?

His backstory is inspired somewhat by the Gollum of Jewish lore and even a little by Tik-Tok of Oz, who was a protector of sorts too. There are obvious pop culture elements in the design but there are some that are more subtle and some that were subconsciously incorporated. I have no control of my pop culture soaked brain.

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Lavabear: Classic Ed. Vinyl. 8 inches tall. Limited to 125 pieces. $80. SDCC 3DRetro Booth #5049

4) What about Octopup? How did you decide on all the different colorways? Were you trying to make me angry because I gotta catch them all?

Making you angry is always just a happy accident. As my first sofubi, I just chose color ways that would really pop. Stay tuned for some custom pieces from others artists soon.

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Octopup: Octocrush Ed. Sofubi (Soft Japanese Vinyl). 2 inches. $10. SDCC 3DRetro Booth #5049

5) You also collaborated with Flat Bonnie and came up with a rad and squishy Octoplush version. Any future collaborations with her or other artists?

For SDCC, Flat Bonnie and I will have 3 Octoplush: Aquapup Ed. mini plushes as giveaways at the 3DRetro booth #5049. There will be 3 “Golden” tickets hidden inside the header cards of the Octopup: Octocrush Ed. sofubis. If you get a ticket, present it to 3DRetro and take home a free Octoplush.

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SDCC 3DRetro Booth #5049

6) Your toys are awesome, but you’ve also released some fantastic art. What artists do you admire? Is there anything in particular you think influences your style?

There are too many to list if we’re talking about admiration and even influence whether big or small. But I think artists like Kozik, John K., Tim Burton and others that juxtapose cartoons with darker themes or underlying messages probably influenced me the most. I like taking a cute, large character and adding something subtly sinister or off to them. A friend once called my style “cute macabre”, and I’ll happily take that description.

7) “My Father, My Lord” might be my favorite print of yours because I’m a dark, emo nerd. For those of us who can’t even draw stick figures, can you talk about the process of coming up with a piece like this? Is this how you usually work?

I don’t ever really work the same way from one piece to the next.  It really depends on what it calls for and the mood I’m in. This one in particular came together really quickly. Once I had the concept, the rough was finished surprisingly fast. It’s something very dear to my heart, so it just came naturally. Then, it was just adding bits here and there and refining the whole thing.

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8) Out of all the characters you’ve created, which one are you the most proud of?

Lavabear is my favorite hands down. It contains many elements that I’ve found myself using in other toys and resins. In addition to that, there are a few pop culture references too, one obvious and the rest were subconsciously incorporated. Bubbling up from my nerdy pop culture ladened brain.

9) What other exciting things can fans and collectors expect from Nathan Hamill in the future? Can you give us any spoilers?

2015 will be a great one. Lots to look forward to, but the one I’m most excited about will be very appropriate for the year. And, no, it’s not Star Wars!

Thanks, Nathan! And I’m totally getting one of your MimoPowerTubes while I’m at the con. So rad looking and practical!

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Mimoco’s SDCC Booths #5245 and #2913M

Visit www.nathanhamill.com for the latest news on his current and future releases.

Steampunk 101 Panelists

Making Comic Con Your Own – Steampunk Style

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San Diego Comic Con International 2013 has been over for a few weeks now.  Attendees have finally recuperated from the chaos and excitement that is SDCC.  As exhausting and chaotic as the pop culture convention is, the experience is also an extremely rewarding one for many.  One of my favorite aspects of SDCC is the sense that not only are you part of a massive geek/nerd community, but you can also create your own world within that community.  Whether you love steampunk cosplay or consider yourself the ultimate TV geek, there are different experiences for any fan at SDCC, you just have to make it.  This is the first post in what I hope to be a couple of interviews with women who helped create their own personalized mini-universe within the zeitgeist that is SDCC.

Dina as Steampunk Malificent at WonderCon 2013

Dina as Steampunk Malificent at WonderCon 2013

Lady Steam (aka Dina Kampmeyer) is a co-founder of the League of Extraordinary Ladies and a self-described steampunk aficionado.  This year Dina moderated two panels on steampunk at SDCC, The Witty Women of Steampunk and Steampunk 101in addition to cosplaying as a steampunk Luke Skywalker.  If you are interested in hearing more about Dina’s involvement with the League of Extraordinary Ladies, you can read her thoughts in a previous interview NiB had with her (and other LxLers).

1)  How did you first get interested/involved in steampunk?

Dina Kampmeyer (DK): I started dating someone that was a steampunk and I had absolutely no idea what it is, but I was instantly drawn to the aesthetic. I jumped in with both feet and wanted to meet other people in LA that were into the same thing. The community was a bit disorganized, so I started volunteering my time to start planning occasional events and moderate the two FB pages that were already up and running.

2)     What was your first steampunk costume?

DK: It was a pseudo-military look. I bought this great jacket online and went crazy modifying it. I cut off the sleeves, laced up the sides and added a ton of trim, buttons, epilets, etc. Then I added a bunch of ruching to this old skirt I had from college. Added a straw hat from the Renaissance Faire and boom, (not so) instant steampunk.

3)     One thing I particularly love about SDCC is the feeling of belonging while at the same time creating your own reality/dream. Steampunk seems to fit into this idea perfectly. Why do you think steampunk has gained so much interest/traction at SDCC and other conventions?

DK: I think there are a lot of reasons why steampunk has become so popular in general, but in terms of conventions, I would say people just love the aesthetic. It’s so playful and it really allows costumers and cosplays a degree of freedom that they don’t usually have in other areas. Most cosplayers are looking to recreate an exact costume, but with steampunk, you don’t do that. You’re not dressing up as someone else’s character (in general), but rather creating a brand-new work of art. I think more people are getting into the genre now through this new trend of steampunking out existing pop culture characters. This is an easier way for them to explore steampunk while working with an existing product, but with an amazing degree of
creativity and freedom.

Steampunk Star Wars at SDCC 2013

Steampunk Star Wars at SDCC 2013

4)     What kind of advice can you give someone who is looking to create their first steampunk cosplay costume?

DK: Try not to be intimidated. I hear so many people who are interested in steampunk worry that they don’t have the “right”
clothing or accessories. There is very little right and wrong in steampunk and we LOVE to help out new people, give them advice and heck, even loan them clothes. Come to steampunk events even if you’re just starting out, take a look at outfits that you like, and ask people how they created things. Go to local thriftshops and try and use your imagination. You’ll be surprised at how much you can create with an old dress and a sewing machine (or some safety pins and tape if you don’t sew).

5)     You recently moderated a panel at SDCC called “The Witty Women of Steampunk.”  Can you give a general synopsis of the panel for those who were unable to attend SDCC (or the panel)?  What was your favorite moment of the panel?

DK: I was very lucky to have this panel accepted by the lovely folks at SDCC for the 2nd year in a row. Basically, I put together an incredible group of female creators and just let them talk about why they love steampunk and what about the genre appeals to them as a creator. We talked comics, alternate history, video games, costuming, multiculturalism and more.

6)     Why “Witty Women” of Steampunk?

DK: Part of what is so appealing about steampunk is a return to the Victorian ideals of the pursuit of knowledge and civility. People were very interested in improving both themselves and the world around them. I think we all long to return to a time when wit was a prized possession and my panelists all fit that bill.

Steampunk 101 Panelists

Steampunk 101 Panelists

7)     You also moderated a panel entitled, “Steampunk 101.” Based on discussions at that panel (and of course your own thoughts), what do see for the future of steampunk in popular culture?

DK: Excellent question. The popularity of steampunk has positively exploded over the past couple of years and we expect to see more and more of it in popular culture. It’s been huge amongst the convention crowd for a long time, but Hollywood is slowly starting to take notice. Fox just gleenlit a League of Extraordinary Gentlemen TV-pilot, so we’ll see if we finally get a big steampunk series. There has yet to be a big steampunk movie and the panelists (and audience) were all interested in seeing one. Steampunk-literature is popping up all over the NY Times bestseller chart, so I think it’s only a matter of time before we see a big film coming out. Until then, we can keep ourselves occupied with all the fantastic literature and webseries that have directly explored the genre.

8)     This year you cosplayed as Steampunk Luke Skywalker.  What prompted you to do a gender-swap steampunk cosplay?

DK: Well, I have wanted to do a steampunk Star Wars group for several years and I finally managed to do it. I always intended to be R2D2, but time snuck up on me and we were missing a Luke from our core group, so I thought, why not? He was quite a challenge to find a way to make him distinctive since his outfit isn’t that unique and I was already going to confuse people by crossplaying. I hope that I succeeded and we’ll be building up this group for future conventions and adding some new characters.

 

Photo by Mike Rollerson

Photo by Mike Rollerson

Chrissy Lynn is a CA native who began costuming at a very young age. With a major interest in comics and scifi growing up she attended her first comic convention in 2004. She’s always had a passion for the arts; be it charcoal, make-up, costume design or music. She’s used her talents and skills to help fundraise for many non-profit charity organizations and enjoys cosplaying, especially her signature cosplay, Catwoman. Since her first Cosplay at Comicon in 2010 she’s been involved in 6 Cosplay groups, two of which she organized including the DC Steampunk group which debuted at SDCC in 2012. She was introduced to Steampunk in 2007, being a fan of HG Wells, Jules Verne and other scifi authors during the turn of the century she adopted the Victorian science fiction motif and made it apart of her daily style and Cosplay medium of choice. This year at San Diego Comicon she was invited by a good friend to join a Steampunk Star Wars group which turned out to be a hit and will be back at this year’s Stan Lee’s Comikaze Expo.

1) Your DC Steampunk cosplay group is amazing! How did that come together?

Chrissy Lynn (CL): It all started with having a passion for both the DC Comics universe and Steampunk Culture. I simply started piecing together the idea shortly after Comicon 2011 and thats when I called upon my very good friend Johnny Bias (Steampunk Riddler), from there we reached out to our close friends who we knew would be interested,and could all work together to make these costumes cohesive and photograph well. We all have a hand in something on everyone’s costumes, it’s a team effort that has grown into a family, some cosplayers retire their character and are replaced with other awesome cosplayers. I couldn’t be more proud of this group, we all did this together.

SDCC 2012 DC Steampunk Group - Photo by Mike Rollerson

SDCC 2012 DC Steampunk Group – Photo by Mike Rollerson

2) Did you all work together on your costumes? If so, which costume did you find the most challenging to put together?

CL: We all came from different skill sets, some of us are tailors and seamstresses, leather workers and some of us are FX and prop fabricators, or geniuses with industrial glue guns. So far what characters you haven’t seen in the group yet are our most challenging. But I’d say, my occasional challenge is doing our Two Face’s makeup because he is unfortunately allergic to latex, so next time I may need to work with silicone!

3) If you had unlimited resources, what would be your ultimate steampunk cosplay (group or individual)?

CL: I’ve been in talks with several individuals who want to do Disney Steampunk, I was honored to recently be a part of this year’s Star Wars Steampunk group with Dina, and I have to say I’d stick with the DC group, only make it BIGGER. 😉 However I wouldn’t mind doing a Steampunk X-men group, just sayin’!

4) Any advice to anyone else trying to put together a cosplay group (steampunk or otherwise) for a convention?

CL: YouTube is filled to the brim on HOW-TO’s and DIY videos, if you are a visual learner check those out, otherwise do what we all have done, trial and error. If I knew 5 years ago what I know now with today’s skill set I would have made ALL the things, at least better. But like any other trade it can take years to master, you don’t always need a sewing machine or unlimited funds, I have a gift for deconstructing pre-existing materials into other objects to fit my cosplay needs. So I encourage everyone to try and remember cosplay is just that, it’s costume play, so play and have fun no matter what!

 

DC Steampunk Photos by Mike Rollerson

Star Wars Steampunk Photo by Jerry Abuan

Steampunk Malificent Photo by Justin Davidson

Image Courtesy of Doomlurker on Batman Wikia

SDCC ’11: The Superhero Battlefield

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Presented by trauma psychologist, Dr. Andrea Letamendi, author of The Psychology of Superheroes, Dr. Robin Rosenberg, Dr. Travis Langley and comics writer Len Wein, the panel was a discussion of how trauma is portrayed in comics and how superheroes deal with trauma. This is a topic that I find fascinating for a number of reasons. I went into the panel not quite knowing what to expect beyond the fact that trauma or tragedy is very often presented as the catalyst for a character’s development in comics. Trauma is something the audience hasn’t necessarily experienced, but can empathize with. Unfortunately, there are people who deal with trauma on a daily basis: Soldiers and other service-members, police officers, fire fighters and EMS personnel. There are questions about how trauma affects characters. Why does one character become a superhero and one a supervillain? (The answer is fairly simple: every villain is the hero of his or her story.) Watching footage of IED (improvised explosive device) explosions, it’s not hard to imagine that days, weeks, months and years of exposure to those circumstances can and does alter both military and civilians exposed to it, in profound ways.

Image Courtesy of Doomlurker on Batman Wikia

One of the characters in comics with a backstory that many of us can relate to is Batman. Sure, Bruce Wayne is incredibly rich, but he’s also witnessed his parents’ violent murder. Trauma to a child is something most of us feel sympathetic towards, and the desire to both avenge his parents and protect others from experiencing the same or similar loss is one most of us would hope we’d have. Heroism isn’t about the trauma, but about empathy and how that trauma is synthesized into the victim’s experience. Peter Parker/Spiderman is another good example of how plausible trauma is used in comics to give a character the imperative to use their powers for good. “With great power comes great responsibility,” is the echo throughout his early days as the web-slinger, and they make all the difference in the world.

I’m very glad that there was a distinction made between Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and the experience of trauma. Not everyone who experiences trauma will experience PTSD. (Additionally, there are distinct phases to PTSD, and not everyone experiences it the same way.) This was not a panel that was glossing over aspects of trauma, but presenting it in a way that can be understood by laymen. Every comic fan has seen numerous depictions of trauma, even if they didn’t name it trauma. I’m also very glad to note that this wasn’t a glossy pep talk about the effects of trauma and how to buck up under pressure. This was a very serious look at trauma through the lens of comics.

One thing I found lacking was the discussion of women as trauma survivors and the reliance in comics on using sexual violence against women. While statistically speaking, sexual and domestic violence are the most common forms of violence women will experience, we have plenty of women in the military. Many of those women have not only experienced the trauma of war, but sexual violence as well. Comics rarely show the arc of how a woman like Barbara Gordon transitions from Batgirl to trauma survivor to Oracle. Harley Quinn, at the other end of the spectrum, is psychologically abused over time by the Joker, and provides a prime example of how trauma doesn’t have to be particularly violent. I think there’s a need to go beyond accepting that fridging and sexual assault/murder of women provides the impetus for Hal Jordan or Frank Castle to go to some very dark places. (Although, as noted by the panel, Frank Castle was already on the anti-social personality disorder spectrum, before he became The Punisher.) Many of the questions asked by the audience also focused far more on male characters than on the spectrum of characters in comics that have been brutalized in any number of ways, from heroes and villains to innocent bystanders.

Oracle Image Courtesy of Wikipedia

This may seem like a strange topic for a panel at a comic convention. I found it a refreshing way of looking at not only a medium that has become an intrinsic part of our collective consciousness, but at a mental health issue that has been placed front and center by current events.

In the last decade, the US has joined much of the rest of the world in experiencing the trauma of terrorism, while the suicide rates for veterans is shockingly high. One in five women (based on current reported incidents) are expected to experience sexual violence in their lifetime. As I type this, rape is being used as a tactic of war in the Congo and Sudan. Trauma is something that happens every day. It happens to people we know, it happens to our families, it happens to us. Comics as a medium are in a unique position to not only present trauma as something that can be survived, but to show how that happens. In my opinion, comics have potential as a treatment tool, giving survivors a connection to characters they recognize and admire. The Unitarian Universalist Service Committee helped to have a comic about Martin Luther King and nonviolent social change printed in Arabic and Farsi for distribution in the Middle East.  Why couldn’t a comic about trauma be used in a similar way wherever it was needed?

As each person or character is a unique individual, responses to trauma will vary. Specifics of why one individual will survive, and another won’t aren’t set in stone. Why one individual becomes Batman, one The Punisher, one the Joker, and one Two-Face is more complex than examining the trauma or the person experiencing it.

These are questions that will continued to be asked by the psychiatric, psychology, and neuropsych fields for a long time. They’re questions human beings face every day, and they are questions that anyone who reads comics has seen posed for a long time. Will comics continue to evolve in how they portray the narratives of the trauma inflicted on protagonists and villains alike? I don’t know the answer to that, yet. I hope they do and I hope that more fans and mainstream media will look at the parallels between comic narratives and real life. Perhaps if we think about those narratives, we can act with more empathy towards those people we encounter every day, who have survived or may struggle with the aftermath of trauma.

I left the panel thinking that there is a lot more discussion to be had and that I would love to see comic creators talk to trauma specialists and survivors a little more, as the subject is so integral to so much of their work.

For more information on PTSD and Trauma go to: National Institute of Mental Health, Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network, and Trauma Survivors Network.

Deborah Vankin, Author Of POSEURS, Geeky Pleasures Radio Show Interview Tomorrow, Live From San Diego Comic-Com

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On Sunday, July 24, 2011, I’ll be doing a special Geeky Pleasures Radio Show broadcast, live from SDCC, on The Look 24/7 (@TheLook247). Deborah Vankin, staff writer for the Los Angeles Times (arts & culture entertainment and nightlife) and former editor-in-chief of the LA Times’ alt weekly publications/websites, Metromix LA and Brand X, and now graphic novel author, will be calling in at 12:30 pm PDT/ 3:30 pm EDT/ 8:30 pm in the UK for a brief chat about SDCC and her graphic novel, POSEURS.

Listening instructions for a variety of platforms—PC and smartphone—can be found here: http://thelook247.com/listen/. You are also invited to join me in chat, http://thelook247.com/chat/. This interview is expected to be quite brief, at roughly 30 minutes.

I hope to see you there.

Deborah Vankin Author Photo

LA Times Female Graphic Novelist signing at SDCC!

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Official Press Release

 

Deborah Vankin, staff writer for the Los Angeles Times (arts & culture entertainment and nightlife) and former editor-in-chief of the LA Times’ alt weekly publications/websites, Metromix LA and Brand X, has released a new graphic novel with indie publisher Image Comics.

Recently reviewed by The Washington Post, the book, Poseurs, is decidedly non-superhero as it follows three very different Los Angeles teenagers who meet in the underworld of LA parties and Hollywood nightlife. Deborah is going to be in San Diego for Comic-Con and will be signing at the event July 23rd from 9:30 to 11:00 am and July 24th from 9:30 to 10:30 am at the Image Comics booth (#2729).

ABOUT DC COMICS’ MINX SERIES

Masterminded by longtime Vertigo editor Shelly Bond, MINX published original graphic novels aimed primarily at teenage girls and debuted with The Plain Janes by “Street Angel” artist Jim Rugg and novelist Cecil Castellucci, author of the successful young adult novels, The Queen of Cool and Boy Proof.  The line also included works by novelists such as Rebecca Donner (Sunset Terrace) and Alisa Kwitney (Flirting in Cars), as well as mainstream and acclaimed comics creators like Mike Carey, Brian Wood and Andi Watson.

Bond was inspired to create MINX after observing the growing number of teenage girls reading manga in bookstores. “I started to wonder what was going to happen in a few years when those readers would want something new,” she said at the MINX launch in February, 2007. “So I pitched this line as an alternative to manga, but also as an alternative to traditional fiction, because I thought that it was really about time that teenage readers had their own imprint and that they could experience a brand new visual reading experience.”

ABOUT THE BOOK

Poseurs follows three teenagers from distinctly different corners of Los Angeles who meet in the underworld of LA nightlife and Hollywood parties and get in over their heads! From the graffiti-tagged streets of LA’s eastside to the bloated, billion dollar mansions of Bel Air, it’s a full-blown party noir!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Deborah Vankin is a staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, where she covers arts & culture, entertainment and nightlife. Prior to that, she launched and served as Editor-in-Chief of the LA Times’ alt weekly publications/websites, Metromix LA and Brand X. Deborah’s work has also appeared in LA Weekly, Variety and The New York Times, among many other places. Her essays and short fiction have been produced at Spoken Interludes and Word Theatre in Los Angeles. Originally from Philadelphia, POSEURS is her first foray into comics.

She’s currently working on her second graphic novel.

***

978-1607063581 | Image Comics (April 5, 2011)

152 Pages | U.S. $16.99 | Distribution: Diamond

 

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Geeky Pleasures Radio Show Broadcast Tonight, Live From The Geek Girls Party At San Diego Comic-Con

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Like many poor, unfortunate souls, I was unable to make the physical trek to San Diego International Comic-Con. However, thanks to the brilliance of technology and living in the future, I’ll still be in attendance, to some degree, and so can you!

Tonight, Geek Girls Network will be hosting their second annual SDCC GGN geek-out. The party begin at 7 pm PDT/ 10 pm EDT/ 1 am in the UK. This just happens to be the same time that I begin hosting my Geeky Pleasures Radio Show at The Look 24/7 (@TheLook247).

My friend, Arturo Garcia (@aboynamedart) is doing the music for the party. He asked me if it would be at all possible to call-in from the party and do a co-host type situation, talk about the con, talk about the party and, of course, geek-out. My response—after I contained my SQUEE—was, “Of course! We live in the future with all kinds of swell technology that allows this to be possible! This will be fun!”

But wait, it gets better! Nicole Wakelin (@NicoleWakelin), who I know through GeekMom, will also be at the party! This means she will also be on the phone tonight, live from the party, to discuss her first trip to SDCC and more. Plus, she will be helping to enable the shenanigans by running around the party, like a mad fool, and pulling other people onto the phone to talk about all things geek and SDCC related.

Sounds fun, doesn’t it?

If you are like me, poor and unfortunate, unable to attend SDCC but still would like to be there in some capacity, then we invite you to tune-in tonight, beginning at 7 pm PDT/ 10 pm EDT/ 1 am in the UK. Tuning-in is simple. You don’t even need to be at your computer. If you have a smartphone, you can listen from wherever you may be at the time. Isn’t technology awesometastic!

Listening instructions for a variety of platforms—PC and smartphone—can be found here: http://thelook247.com/listen/.

If you want a more interactive experience, then we invite you to come join us in chat athttp://thelook247.com/chat/. That way, you can participate in the conversation and ask whatever questions you may have of those who happen to be pulled onto the show. If you want to participate in chat, you will need to create an account on The Look 24/7, using a valid e-mail address in order to validate your account. Instructions and links are on the chat page.

We hope to see you there!

Image Courtesy of elfquestfantrailer.com

“ElfQuest” Creators and Fan-Film Cast Unite at Comic-Con International

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Official Press Release

 

Elves are descending on San Diego at Comic Con International 2011 for the panel “ElfQuest: From the Woods to the Web” on Friday, July 22nd at 8pm.

New media producers/actors Stephanie Thorpe (GOLD: Night of the Zombie King) and Paula Rhodes (A Good Knight’s Quest) are responsible for the current phenomenon of fan resurgence in the mystical comic book series ElfQuest, created by Wendy and Richard Pini in 1978.

Image Courtesy of elfquestfantrailer.comThorpe and Rhodes collaborated to create the fan-made, non-profit trailer “ElfQuest: A Fan Imagining” which has been earning high praise from the media and enormous fan support since launching in April at the Screen Actors Guild New Media premiere. Lifelong fans of the comic book, Thorpe and Rhodes pulled together their skills and resources, along with a cast of famed ‘women of the web’ and donations from other devoted fans to create the world of Two Moons.

ElfQuest tells the tale of a tribe of elves who find themselves driven from their forest by humans and must find a new home. It’s known for its magical artistry and for being a vanguard of the indie/fantasy scene. Originally self published by the Pini’s, the comic book series was later picked up by Marvel and DC Comics, respectively.

Up next, Thorpe and Rhodes are looking at features that resonate with their geek heritage for their next project together. Individually, Rhodes will return to webseries Hollywood Wasteland, while Thorpe is currently working on a sci-fi series with director Andrew Erin (Confined), and a travel/food/fashion show with host Kristyn Burtt. Thorpe is proud to announce 10 episodes of the new series “Shelf Life,” premiering at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con. The live action comedy was produced by Thorpe with Yuri Lowenthal (Legion of Superheroes) and Tara Platt (Afterworld) and directed by Eisner Award-winning comic author Paul Jenkins.

Panel Details: Friday, July 22nd at 8pm / San Diego Convention Center, Room 4
Panel Participants: Stephanie Thorpe (GOLD: Night of the Zombie King), Paula Rhodes (A Good Knight’s Quest), Wendy and Richard Pini (authors), with host Taryn Southern (Battle: Los Angeles)
About the Panel: The panel will examine the changing landscape of fan fiction, social media, and the web, bringing together the creators and cast of “ElfQuest: A Fan Imagining”; along with special guests Wendy and Richard Pini, who will share exclusive, never-before-seen ElfQuest art and the latest news.

For Information or To Watch “ElfQuest: A Fan Imagining” visit: www.ElfQuestFanTrailer.com

Double Nathan All The Way!

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This was just shared with me by the awesome Edgar Garcia. It’s a little old and many of you have probably seen it but if not, heh!

The story goes that on Sunday morning just before SDCC Nathan Fillion started retweeting every DRATW tweet. Edgar got one too many RTs and, as a result, he made this hilarious little video. Enjoy!

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